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Thursday, 29 August 2013

TWDK and World Space Week 2013

Today, space is a veritable hotbed of science, and we've already posted a good number of space science posts. There's certainly no shortage of Things We Don't Know about space, but there's also a lot of science that takes place in space. So this year, we're offering a unique opportunity to anybody who'd like to try their hands at science writingWrite an article about science in one of the below categories, and TWDK will publish the best throughout World Space Week, October 4-10. Entrants can be scientists, students, school pupils or just members of the public - we'll consider anything by anyone, provided it's accurate, well written, about ongoing research and related to space!

As an added bonus, we'll do our very best to review early submissions and provide feedback, so authors can improve their article before the deadline.

Categories
Looking Up - science connecting to space but done on here on Earth. This includes astronomy, the development of new rocket engines, and much more.

Looking Down - science done in space, looking down at the Earth. This includes weather satellites and environmental monitoring, or even archaeology.

Floating Around - science done in space, without looking down. Astronauts on board the International Space Station have conducted a huge number of experiments, from psychology to biology to plasma physics and crystal growth.

Getting Outta Here - science done away from the Earth. NASA, ESA, RosCosmos and JAXA have all sent probes into deep space to conduct science well away from home. Upcoming missions from Europe include ExoMars, and LISA Pathfinder - and NASA is planning many more.

Applications must be received by Friday, 27th September 2013. Articles should be sent in .doc or similar format, by email to wsw@thingswedontknow.com

Other WSW activities
If you'd like to know more about what's going on in World Space Week, there's a full list of UK events on the British Interplanetary Society's website. If you're not in the UK, you can find out who your national co-ordinator is here.