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Monday, 16 September 2019

Diving with ‘Monsters’

Why are we so fascinated by monsters? Creatures of the jungles, of the deepest oceans, and of historic eras in our planet’s past have long captured our imaginations. Perhaps it’s our evolutionary instinct to learn from our enemies, and to study to outwit and outcompete our rivals. One thing is true: we have long been fascinated with monsters, and where better to find the unknown, the mysterious and the monstrous, than in the 1.3 billion cubic kilometers of oceans that stretches across our planet?

...Or, perhaps, in a small Blue Planet aquarium near Chester. Which is where I’m taking you now.

Shark in the Blue Planet aquarium, Chester. © TWDK

Tuesday, 10 September 2019

Weight (Things We Don’t Know about Pregnancy Series #2)

If you’re pregnant and you’ve been reading books, boards and information sites, like me, you’ve probably got the wrong end of the stick about some things – such as weight. And the reason is this: having a baby in the UK is very different from having a baby in the US, and the US dominates these platforms.

Partly, this is because the NHS is unforthcoming: they don’t share information about being pregnant until you are. Their websites offer the bare minimum; their leaflets aren’t much better; they don’t answer my emails; and their advice is always to talk to your midwife. As mine explained to me, information is drip-fed as you progress to “prevent you from being bombarded”. Or, in other words, to maintain control over information access.

Meanwhile, the US sites would lead you to believe that medical health professionals are obsessed with monitoring, managing, and manipulating your weight gain throughout pregnancy, including berating you if you gain too little weight or, more emphatically, if you gain too much.

Diagram of weight versus gestational age by Yehudamalul via Wikipedia Commons.

Monday, 26 August 2019

Morning Sickness (Things We Don’t Know about Pregnancy Series #1)

Recently, I’ve needed to take a lie down after every meal. This isn’t because I have a food baby – it’s because I’m having an actual baby, and that’s when morning sickness really hits me.

Numbers vary, but reports suggest two thirds or more women will experience some sort of morning sickness – which can include vomiting, nausea, food aversions, and feeling “under the weather”.

Most women get it between weeks 6 and 14 in the first trimester of pregnancy, but some get it earlier, have it fade sooner, or suffer it for most of the 9 months they are carrying. Some never get it. Some women suffer all hours of the night and day (I like to think the objectionable term “morning sickness” refers not to a propensity to suffer only in the mornings, but to the sickness as the “beginning” or “dawn” of pregnancy or motherhood), and some find it comes and goes throughout the day or even week to week. Some get it at specific times of day, or have it triggered by brushing their teeth, particular foods, or particular smells (I didn’t think smell affected me until someone walked past me on a train with one of those heavily processed Cornish pasties!). Unfortunately, we don’t know what causes morning sickness, nor why it varies so much woman to woman.

What causes morning sickness? Image via Wikipedia Commons.

Saturday, 17 August 2019

Sleep Paralysis - A Ghost Story

I’ve just had my first sleep paralysis with shadows.

Champion of ghost stories, sleep paralysis is thought to lie behind hundreds and thousands of ghost stories and alien abductions every year.

It affects up to half of us during our lifetimes. It may even have happened to you.

We still have much to learn about how sleep works, how the brain works, and how our emotions guide understanding. One fascinating insight is this phenomenon. Rather like opening up the back of a watch, it spills its guts and opens up more scientific questions than it answers.

Shadow -  © TWDK
Sleep paralysis happens when the waking and sleeping parts of the brain become confused, usually just when you are about to drift off, or just as you awaken. When we’re in REM sleep, all of our muscles are frozen, except those in our eyes and diaphragm, to prevent us from acting out our dreams: when we suffer sleep paralysis, they remain frozen, even though our minds – our desperately trapped, struggling brains – are wide, wide awake.

It feels like you’re being held in place by invisible forces: unable to scream, unable to sit up. Worse, your paralysed torso forces you to breathe shallowly, and during the few seconds or minutes that sleep paralysis takes hold, it feels like a weight has been placed upon your chest, the ghost is sitting on you, squeezing out all the air… And, with air deficiency comes a real feeling of panic, and a powerful sense of impending doom.

Thursday, 25 July 2019

Traumatic Brain Injury and Ageing

Written by Sofia Amirbayat
Edited by Rowena Fletcher-Wood

The brain is a complex organ that has a natural ability to adapt and change with time; it is made of about 100 billion neurons, able to connect to each other in networks and pathways. What makes these networks is our lived experiences with the world and people. When a baby is born, the brain has specialised areas for sensory perception, but doesn't have many learned pathways yet and is very open to learning and forming networks.

Lateral View of the Brain by BruceBlaus [CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

There are several interesting parts of the brain, but perhaps the most interesting is the prefrontal cortex. The prefrontal cortex is involved in higher cognition, planning, decision making, personality and social behaviours. There is one category of cognition that is often associated with the prefrontal cortex: executive functions – a group of complex mental processes and cognitive abilities such as working memory, impulse inhibition, and reasoning.

Patients with prefrontal cortex damage can experience blunted emotional responses, which may negatively affect their ability to make decisions. This can lead to them failing to see the consequences of their actions (what we call “thinking ahead”).

How does the structure of the brain change as you age?

Tuesday, 9 July 2019

When is a Strawberry No Longer a Strawberry?

You take that first bite, tearing through the cells of the red berry and allowing its fragrance to erupt. Juices ooze, coating your mouth. The sweetness, modulated with a slight bitter hint, hits your tongue and lights up your senses, and the distinctive flavour of the strawberry overflows.

Why do we love strawberries so much?


Why do we love strawberries so much? There’s something alluring about them, something intense and complex in the flavour we experience that is not matched by any other berry – its chemistry.

When we recognise a flavour – the combined experience of taste, mouth feel and (crucially) smell – we are actually recognising the aromatic chemistry of a food, the volatile molecules given off when we bring it close to our nose or after we bite into it. When we understand the molecules that make up the distinct chemical profile of a flavour, we can replicate it by creating those chemicals in a lab and stirring them together. This helps us make artificial banana flavour, artificial vanilla flavour, and artificial fresh grass smell. But strawberries are awkward. Strawberry flavour is made up of a chemical medley of many, many different molecules (more than 350), variation exists strawberry species to strawberry species, and we just don’t know how important each chemical is.

This is in direct contrast to the raspberry, a humble berry that we recognise as 4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)butan-2-one, or “raspberry ketone”. Whilst cranberries and blackberries also contain this odour, they mix it with other chemicals, whilst in the raspberry it is exclusively responsible for the raspberry profile we instantly know.

Raspberry ketone, the molecule behind the smell we know so well. © Things We Don't Know.

Wednesday, 19 June 2019

Lifetime of a Plastic Bag


450 years into the future - that’s the agreed lifetime of a uniform piece of plastic like a bag. But who’s arguing? Man-made plastics have only been around for about 50 years: we don’t know for sure how long it takes a plastic bag to decompose: so where does this number come from?

A floating plastic bag. Like so many, it has ended up in the ocean. Image credit: Andrew (Flickr).

Plastic readily breaks down into smaller and smaller pieces (microplastics) under environmental conditions: it can now be found anywhere, a splash of colour amongst sand particles viewed beneath a microscope. But this isn’t the same as biodegradation, defined as the bacteria-driven chemical transformation of a material into other compounds.

Natural plastics do exist and do biodegrade: rubber and cellulose, for example. But these don’t make a good comparison with man-made plastics: cellulose is eaten by many animals, and enzymes and microorganisms exist in nature to catalyse its break down, which normally happens by about 6 months[1]. There are some man-made plastic-eating bacteria, but these have only recently been discovered: how fast they act or what products the plastics are broken down into (and whether they are safe and useful) is still a mystery[2].

Friday, 31 May 2019

Toxic Climate: how climate change changes pollution

When it comes to climate change, contaminated land is the forgotten risk.

Climate change leaves us worrying about quite a lot of things: tropical diseases, extreme weather events, extinctions... But we don’t tend to worry about pollution outbreaks. In DEFRA’s climate change risk assessment, it doesn’t even get a mention.

But is that because we’ve forgotten the risks, or because we don’t know?

Extreme weather may affect land safety, access and use. Image © Rowena Fletcher-Wood

Lots of land is “contaminated land”. This doesn’t mean it glows yellow in the dark or is a breeding site for mutant flesh-eating bacteria. Most land is contaminated by waste from agriculture, industry, energy or medicine, and that can be anything from fertilisers that cause algal overgrowths to pharmaceuticals that make male fish feminine[1]. Humans like to concentrate chemicals to put them to use doing specific jobs. This is great when they’re where they’re supposed to be, but leftover chemicals or waste products are still relatively concentrated and can be poisonous or harmful.

Contaminants can also come from the land itself: like arsenic, which is rife in various rocks. Or radon, a radioactive gas found in granite, and especially Cornwall.

There are three main ways of dealing with chemicals in the environment:

1. Spread them out – diluting them more and more until they’re no longer at harmful concentrations
2. Concentrate them – and lock them up in a box or a landfill somewhere they can’t do any harm
Or 3. Change them. Chemical reactions can change the nature of some chemicals, such as pharmaceuticals, making potentially harmful things into harmless things.

These processes are called remediation.